Dr. Feelgood
Tomorrow

Upcoming Episodes

Wednesday, May 22

The dazzlingly ditzy reality star and former Playboy model was found dead of a prescription drug overdose in February 2007. Her tragic story is a cautionary tale of excess and indulgence in Hollywood, and how a celebrity’s chaotic lifestyle can cloud the better judgment of those caught in the whirlwind. Howard K. Stern, Anna’s lawyer and manager, along with Dr. Khristine Eroshevich, and Dr. Sandeep Kapoor were accused of conspiring to prescribe excess drugs to Anna. The legal battle raged. Dr. Sandeep Kapoor was aquitted of all charges. However, Dr. Eroshevich and Howard K. Stern were convicted in 2010 of two counts of conspiring to obtain prescriptions under a false name. but a year later, an appeals court reversed the ruling. Deputy Dist. Atty. Sean Carney objected to the reduction saying a message needed to be sent to doctors who bend the laws for celebrities. 'It's an epidemic of doctors prescribing to celebrities and celebrities dying because doctors won't uphold their oath.’ Show Less
The dazzlingly ditzy reality star and former Playboy model was found dead of a prescription drug overdose in February 2007. Her tragi...Show More

About Dr. Feelgood

We trust Doctors with our lives – to heal us when we’re sick and guide us on a path towards healthy living.  But what happens when the person you’ve entrusted with your well being is doing more harm than good?  Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, Anna Nicole Smith and many more lived whirlwind lives in public eye – adored by millions.  For those around them, it was easy to get sucked into the non-stop celebrity lifestyle – and sometimes that even included their doctors.

Dr. Feelgood tells the shocking true stories of the symbiotic relationships between celebrities and their doctors whose drug prescriptions or procedures led to controversy, mystery, and ultimately tragedy for their notable clients.  Can a doctor remain objective when immersed in the world of their celebrity clients?  And where does the responsibility lie: with the user, or the doctor who put the drugs in there hands?