Collision Course
All New Sunday

Upcoming Episodes

Sunday, August 19

On a sunny October day in 1997 music legend John Denver hopped into a small and sleek aircraft to go for a pleasure flight off the California coast. After his aircraft suddenly and mysteriously crashes into the Pacific Ocean some suspected the singer may have committed suicide or given his history of DUI’s he may have been intoxicated. The last man to see Denver alive gives his first-ever TV interview and recalls Denver in the minutes before he died – a personal and detailed account that has never been told. It’s revealed that Denver was neither drunk nor suicidal – the shocking cause of the accident comes down to a tiny mechanical detail that took the life of one of the world’s first celebrity activists. Show Less
On a sunny October day in 1997 music legend John Denver hopped into a small and sleek aircraft to go for a pleasure flight off the Cal...Show More

On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the middle of the North Atlantic and sank within a few hours, drowning 1500 of its 2,200 passengers. The theories on how she sank are numerous. Was it the smouldering fire in the ship’s coal bunker that accelerated the ship’s sinking? Perhaps the ship was built from brittle and inferior steel? Was the rapid sinking caused by weak rivets, or a fatal design flaw in the ship’s watertight compartments? Collision Course: Titanic explores all the theories, no matter how incredible and leads to the final determination that the real cause of the accident is over-confidence in technology and arrogance that any ship could be “unsinkable.” Show Less
On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the mi...Show More

Monday, August 20

On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the middle of the North Atlantic and sank within a few hours, drowning 1500 of its 2,200 passengers. The theories on how she sank are numerous. Was it the smouldering fire in the ship’s coal bunker that accelerated the ship’s sinking? Perhaps the ship was built from brittle and inferior steel? Was the rapid sinking caused by weak rivets, or a fatal design flaw in the ship’s watertight compartments? Collision Course: Titanic explores all the theories, no matter how incredible and leads to the final determination that the real cause of the accident is over-confidence in technology and arrogance that any ship could be “unsinkable.” Show Less
On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the mi...Show More

On a sunny October day in 1997 music legend John Denver hopped into a small and sleek aircraft to go for a pleasure flight off the California coast. After his aircraft suddenly and mysteriously crashes into the Pacific Ocean some suspected the singer may have committed suicide or given his history of DUI’s he may have been intoxicated. The last man to see Denver alive gives his first-ever TV interview and recalls Denver in the minutes before he died – a personal and detailed account that has never been told. It’s revealed that Denver was neither drunk nor suicidal – the shocking cause of the accident comes down to a tiny mechanical detail that took the life of one of the world’s first celebrity activists. Show Less
On a sunny October day in 1997 music legend John Denver hopped into a small and sleek aircraft to go for a pleasure flight off the Cal...Show More

Thursday, August 23

On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the middle of the North Atlantic and sank within a few hours, drowning 1500 of its 2,200 passengers. The theories on how she sank are numerous. Was it the smouldering fire in the ship’s coal bunker that accelerated the ship’s sinking? Perhaps the ship was built from brittle and inferior steel? Was the rapid sinking caused by weak rivets, or a fatal design flaw in the ship’s watertight compartments? Collision Course: Titanic explores all the theories, no matter how incredible and leads to the final determination that the real cause of the accident is over-confidence in technology and arrogance that any ship could be “unsinkable.” Show Less
On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the mi...Show More

Friday, August 24

On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the middle of the North Atlantic and sank within a few hours, drowning 1500 of its 2,200 passengers. The theories on how she sank are numerous. Was it the smouldering fire in the ship’s coal bunker that accelerated the ship’s sinking? Perhaps the ship was built from brittle and inferior steel? Was the rapid sinking caused by weak rivets, or a fatal design flaw in the ship’s watertight compartments? Collision Course: Titanic explores all the theories, no matter how incredible and leads to the final determination that the real cause of the accident is over-confidence in technology and arrogance that any ship could be “unsinkable.” Show Less
On the night of April 14, 1912, the RMS Titanic, on her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, collided with an iceberg in the mi...Show More

Sunday, August 26

Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesars Palace, Las Vegas stunt? Show Less
Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesa...Show More

Monday, August 27

Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesars Palace, Las Vegas stunt? Show Less
Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesa...Show More

In 1999, John F. Kennedy Jr.’s aircraft plunges into the Atlantic Ocean killing him, his wife Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy and her sister Lauren. This episode examines the factors at play which contributed to the crash looking back at JFK Jr.’s life and the experiences which shaped him – often through first-hand accounts from people who knew him. This is an investigation into one of the most magnetic personalities of the 20th century whose life was taken too early in an accident caused by a series of seemingly insignificant factors—that when tied together led to tragedy. Show Less
In 1999, John F. Kennedy Jr.’s aircraft plunges into the Atlantic Ocean killing him, his wife Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy and her siste...Show More

Thursday, August 30

Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesars Palace, Las Vegas stunt? Show Less
Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesa...Show More

Friday, August 31

Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesars Palace, Las Vegas stunt? Show Less
Why did Evel Knievel, a daredevil performer who was famous for spectacular, airborne, motorcycle stunts, crash during his famous Caesa...Show More

About Collision Course

Collision Course unravels the speculation surrounding car and airplane crashes involving celebrities relying on footage from the scene, police records, CGI reenactments and interviews with eyewitnesses to provide a detailed look at what put these celebrities on a collision course. Episodes include Paul Walker, Tracy Morgan, John Denver, Justin Bieber and John F. Kennedy Jr.