The Shocking Truth
Friday, Dec. 28

Upcoming Episodes

Friday, December 28

The story of a hockey-mask wearing serial killer stalking his victims at a summer camp has inspired numerous sequels and reboots since its debut in 1980. But the Shocking Truth is that this horrifying story has its roots in the Nordic region of Europe. On Sunday, June 5th of 1960, four young teenagers were camping out on Finland’s Lake Bodom, a picturesque locale that bears a striking resemblance to the faux Crystal Lake. Between 4am and 6am, an unknown maniac wielding a knife brutally murdered three of the youngsters. The fourth victim managed to escape with a fractured jaw and a concussion. A handful of suspects were questioned by police, including a maintenance man, a vagrant and even a KGB spy, the latter of whom showed up at a local hospital the day after the murders, covered in red stains. Despite the fact that one of the suspects confessed to the murders, sufficient evidence was never found to convict him of the crime, and to this day the bizarre case remains unsolved Show Less
The story of a hockey-mask wearing serial killer stalking his victims at a summer camp has inspired numerous sequels and reboots since...Show More

This famous franchise featuring the vengeful Jigsaw Killer and his elaborate death traps have grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwide. But the Shocking Truth is that this gruesome and bloody franchise is inspired by a century-plus old case. In the late 1800’s, H.H. Holmes began his criminal career by stealing cadavers in medical school. He would mutilate them and then make fraudulent insurance claims on them. In 1886, he moved to Chicago, building a giant hotel to cash in on the Chicago World Fair - but this was no ordinary hotel. The building was designed like a labyrinth, with no windows on the top two floors, staircases leading to nowhere and soundproofed rooms. His victims were often homeless men, who had no idea of the hellacious torture they were about to endure. Director Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio will also revisit this macabre story in their upcoming film “The Devil in the White City.” Show Less
This famous franchise featuring the vengeful Jigsaw Killer and his elaborate death traps have grossed nearly a billion dollars worldwi...Show More

The “Scream” movies featuring the iconic Ghostface killer are one of the most popular horror franchises of all time. The four films have grossed more than $330 million dollar in North America alone. It also spawned a successful TV series in 2015. But the roots of the story go back to a horrifying murder in Florida in the early 1990’s. Screenwriter Kevin Williamson was inspired to draft an 18-page script treatment about a young woman, alone in a house, who is taunted over the phone and then attacked by a masked killer. He borrowed elements from the real story of serial killer Danny Harold Rolling, a.k.a “The Gainesville Ripper” who murdered four female college students in Florida in 1990. Williamson changed the location from a college to a high school for the original film. The opening scene of the first “Scream” movie featured the gruesome murder of a young woman played by Drew Barrymore. Her grisly murder closely resembles the first brutal slaying committed by Rolling. Show Less
The “Scream” movies featuring the iconic Ghostface killer are one of the most popular horror franchises of all time. The four film...Show More

“The Fugitive” was the third highest grossing film of 1993 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. Tommy Lee Jones won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for playing a relentless U.S. Marshal who pursues the wrongfully convicted inmate Dr. Richard Kimble. But the Shocking Truth is that both the movie and TV series are based on a real crime. In 1954, Dr. Sam Sheppard, his wife Marilyn and their young son Sam were living in a two-story house in a Cleveland suburb. On July 4th, Marilyn Sheppard was beaten to death in her bedroom while her husband slept downstairs on the couch. Dr. Sheppard was woken up by the cries of his wife. He immediately ran upstairs to their bedroom. As he entered the bedroom, he saw what he described as a "form" in the room. This “form” later morphed into the infamous “one-armed man” character in both the series and the film. Show Less
“The Fugitive” was the third highest grossing film of 1993 and was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture. Tommy Lee J...Show More

The movie was an instant smash when it hit the theaters in 1977 and reawakened man's obsession with the eternal question: "Are we alone in the universe?" Though a work of fantasy, few realize that Steven Spielberg's sci-fi classic was actually inspired by real-life witness testimony, as well as a series of UFO sightings in Michigan in the summer of 1966. Separate science fact from science fiction as we reexamine government documents and put old witness testimonies to the test using modern technology. Spielberg also based his film on the research of Dr. J. Allen Hynek, a civilian scientific advisor to Project Blue Book who eventually admitted that 11 percent of the study’s findings about nidentified flying objects could not be explained using science. Show Less
The movie was an instant smash when it hit the theaters in 1977 and reawakened man's obsession with the eternal question: "Are we alon...Show More

Before there was a Freddy Krueger, there was the night terror. The horror icon wasn’t born in a boiler room, but he did originate in troubling dreams. A string of real-world deaths inspired the A “Nightmare on Elm Street” films. Witnesses and survivors didn’t report a burn-scarred face or a striped sweater. Death came without warning or explanation, while its victims slept. In the late 1970s to the mid 80s, more than 110 men died in their sleep. Until their quiet final moments, they were young and healthy. Their families were stunned. Investigators were bewildered. With the victims all being Asian, medical authorities named the sleep scourge “Asian Death Syndrome.” Witnesses and families called it the night terror. The first case was reported in California’s Orange County in 1977. By the summer of 1981, 20 people had fallen victim to the night terror. Authorities and medical responders were powerless as men across the country went to sleep and never woke up. Show Less
Before there was a Freddy Krueger, there was the night terror. The horror icon wasn’t born in a boiler room, but he did originate in...Show More

Director Steven Spielberg’s film sees an ordinary family tormented by an evil apparition that later takes the youngest daughter Carol Anne into another realm. But the reality behind the fiction is equally as frightening. The film is loosely based on events at a house on Long Island, New York, where the Hermann family were plagued by a so-called poltergeist. Between February and March 1958, bottle tops and lids inexplicably popped, ornaments flew around the house, a heavy bookshelf mysteriously fell over and a Virgin Mary figure soared through the air and struck a mirror 12 feet away. The family, who moved away soon after, believed the events were somehow connected to an ancient Native American burial site near their home - something that features heavily in Spielberg's movie. Show Less
Director Steven Spielberg’s film sees an ordinary family tormented by an evil apparition that later takes the youngest daughter Caro...Show More

About The Shocking Truth

The Shocking Truth digs deep into notorious real-life murders and crimes and explores how Hollywood turned them into its most memorable thrillers. The behind-the-scenes stories of how these gruesome events became unforgettable movies is as fascinating as the true crimes themselves. Through cinematic re-enactments and exclusive interviews with the writers, directors and cast members, as well as the detectives, attorneys, and criminologists who investigated the actual crimes, we lay out a compelling story line — how despicable wrong doings became art, creating moments etched in our pop culture.